Four Corners of the Kitchen: Flatbreads

Four Corners of the Kitchen: Flatbreads

Flatbreads have been with the human race for over 6,000 years, and since then, they have remained an integral part of many societies. The dish is still popular worldwide, and every country has its own unique flatbread variation. Here are a few flatbread recipes from around the world, along with explanations of their significance.   Indian Naan Naan has been a traditional Indian bread since the fourteenth century and was first cooked in the Imperial Court at Delhi. Its versatility and soft texture have made it a popular addition to many South Asian meals. Ingredients 2 tsp dry active yeast 1 tsp sugar 1/2 cup water 2 ½ –3 cups flour, divided 1/2 tsp salt 1/4 cup olive oil 1/3 cup plain yogurt 1 large egg Directions Dissolve yeast and sugar in water, then let sit for a few minutes or until it is frothy on top. Whisk in the oil, yogurt, and egg until evenly combined. Add salt and flour. Stir until well combined. Continue adding flour, a half cup at a time, until you can no longer stir it with a spoon (about 1 to 1½ cups). Turn the ball of dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead the ball of dough for about 3 minutes, adding small amounts of flour to keep the dough from sticking. You’ll end up using between 2½ to 3 cups flour total. The dough should be smooth and very soft but not sticky. Avoid adding excessive amounts of flour, as this can make the dough too dry and stiff. Cover the dough and let it rise 1 hour. Gently...
Four Corners of the Kitchen: Cilantro

Four Corners of the Kitchen: Cilantro

Curries, marinades, soups, and salsas—although cilantro is used in all of these dishes and more, it remains one of the most debated ingredients in cooking. Despite the fact that this herb elicits a wide range of reactions in the taste buds of food critics, it carries a deep history across continents. Cilantro was found in the Egyptian tomb of Tutankhamen, Neolithic levels of the Israeli Nahal Hemar cave, and the writings of ancient Greek tablets. Read the included recipes to discover some of the ways that cilantro continues to be used and enjoyed all over the world. — Sophia Harper   Mexican Cilantro Lime Rice Ingredients 3 cups of long-grained cooked rice (1 cup uncooked) 2 small limes (or 1 large lime) Zest from 1 lime 1/2 cup of chopped fresh cilantro 1 1/4 teaspoon salt (divided) Directions Cook rice. (In a medium saucepan, bring 1 1/2 cups water to a boil. Add rice and 1/4 teaspoon salt, cover, and reduce to a simmer. Cook until water is absorbed and rice is just tender, 16 to 18 minutes.) Once rice is cooked, fluff with fork. Add lime juice, lime zest, cilantro, and 1 teaspoon salt (or to taste). Stir well and serve warm. Adapted from food.com and marthastewart.com   Cilantro Thai Grilled Chicken Ingredients 2 garlic cloves (coarsely chopped) 1/2 cup cilantro 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil 4 boneless skinless chicken breasts Directions Place garlic, cilantro, soy sauce, and sesame oil in a food processor and process until smooth. Pour marinade over chicken breast and let flavors sink in for 15 minutes in the refrigerator....
Honey: Four Corners of the Kitchen

Honey: Four Corners of the Kitchen

Known for its sweet taste, honey is as versatile as it is delicious. People have taken advantage of this ingredient for thousands of years, in uses ranging from medicinal cough remedies to savory sauces. Honey remains a staple food in cultures across the world. The following recipes, all from different countries, demonstrate just a few of the many delicious uses of honey. Bolivian Tawa Tawas (Fried Bread) 2 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon softened butter 2 eggs, beaten ½ cup water Canola oil for frying Honey Powdered sugar Combine all dry ingredients. Add butter and mix. Add eggs and a small amount of water. Mix well. Continue by gradually adding water and then mix until the ingredients are well combined. (Dough will be sticky.) Place dough onto a floured surface and knead until dough is smooth (about 2 minutes). Cover dough with a towel and let sit for 10 minutes. Roll dough out onto a floured surface until fairly thin (about one-tenth inch). Using a knife (or a pizza cutter), cut the dough into rhombus-shaped pieces. Cover and let dough rest for another 5 minutes. Heat oil in a pot or heavy skillet. Fry each piece of dough until it is puffed up and golden. Turn fried bread to cook both sides. Place fried bread on paper towels. Drizzle with honey, and then dust with powdered sugar. Adapted from theslowcook.com English Honey Posset 1 quart (4 cups) cream (heavy or regular whipping) ½ cup honey ⅓ cup lemon juice 1 tablespoon of lime juice (about ½ a lime) Flavoring of choice (lavender...
Mint: Four Corners of the Kitchen

Mint: Four Corners of the Kitchen

Used in everything from delicious treats to medicinal cures, mint has been a popular herb for centuries. Originally, mint was most commonly found in Middle Eastern culture, but it soon spread across the globe. Different varieties have since emerged, and there is nothing quite like this simple perennial herb. The following are some recipes—both sweet and savory—from around the world that use mint as a key ingredient.   Turkish Lemonana 6 tablespoons sugar ½ cup and 6 tablespoons water, divided ½ cup fresh lemon juice 45 mint leaves 18–20 ice cubes Instructions: Add sugar and 6 tablespoons of water to a small saucepan. Heat over medium heat, stirring constantly, until the sugar is dissolved. Cool to room temperature. Add the cooled sugar syrup, remaining ½ cup water, lemon juice, 40 mint leaves, and ice cubes into a blender. Pulse a few times to break up the ice, then process until slushy. Pour into two tall glasses, garnish with extra mint leaves. Adapted from anediblemosaic.com   Brazilian Kibe 1 cup whole cracked wheat 1½ cups water 2 pounds ground turkey 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 large onion, finely chopped 1½ tablespoons minced garlic ½ teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon nutmeg ⅓ cup chopped parsley ½ cup chopped mint leaves Salt and pepper to taste Vegetable oil for frying Instructions: Place wheat in a bowl. Meanwhile, bring the water to a boil, remove from heat, and pour over the bulgur wheat. Let wheat rest for ½ hour. Make the filling: Place 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a skillet and sauté half of the chopped onions, the minced garlic, and the cinnamon...

Four Corners of the Kitchen: Coconut

Coconut, fruit of the “tree of life,” is a super food. Although coconut trees grow only in tropical and subtropical regions, this tasty treat has reached every corner of the globe. Coconut is sold in many forms, from fresh coconuts to pressed coconut oil to shredded coconut, and it tastes delicious in both sweet and savory dishes. Coconut was introduced to North America in the early 1800s and was very popular in baking and cooking products until the 1950s, when doctors blamed coconuts as a cause of high cholesterol. Thankfully, coconut products have experienced a resurgence in the new millennium, populating vending machines, health-food stores, and baking aisles. New studies show what common coconut consumers have long known intuitively: Consuming coconuts can help lower heart disease and cholesterol, reduce the effects of stress, and improve heart, brain, and gastrointestinal health. Overall, coconut has a host of health-boosting capabilities. The recipes on the following page demonstrate the treatment and variations of coconuts. From North America, we have featured Coconut Ice Cream, an easy-to-assemble homemade ice cream that does not require an ice-cream maker or raw eggs. Beijinhos de Coco are small Brazilian candies that are easy to make and perfect for gatherings. Chicken Bhuna is a curry dish from Bengali that comes together quickly and smells divine. And finally, our variation of Coconut Mango Pudding comes from China—making it a simple and elegant dessert to celebrate the Chinese New Year. coconutresearchcenter.org —Kiersten Cowan   Chicken Bhuna (Bengali Chicken Curry) Ingredients 2 lbs. boneless, skinless chicken, diced in 1/2-inch pieces 2 yellow onions, finely diced 2 tbsp. fresh minced ginger 6...
Limes: Four Corners of the Kitchen

Limes: Four Corners of the Kitchen

There’s nothing better than limes to pack a tangy punch. While you may not be adventurous enough to eat a lime on its own, this member of the citrus family complements a wide range of ingredients. From a cold, creamy drink to a savory soup, these four recipes highlight the way limes are used around the world. Naomi Clegg Brazilian Lemonade Brazil Don’t let the name of this sweet, creamy concoction fool you—it’s actually made out of limes. Just as appealing, whipping up a pitcher of this refreshing drink takes only a few minutes. Ingredients 2 limes ½ cup sugar 3 tablespoons sweetened condensed milk 3 cups water 1 cup ice Directions Wash the limes thoroughly. Cut off the ends, and slice into 4 wedges. Place the limes in a blender with the sugar, sweetened condensed milk, water, and ice. Pulse 5 times. Strain the mixture through a sieve into a large pitcher. Serve over additional ice, if desired. Yield: 4 servings Total time: 5 minutes Elote Mexico Elote is a popular Mexican street food and a particularly delicious way to enjoy fresh-off-the-stalk corn. For easier eating, make esquites: cut the corn off the cobs, and put it in bowls with all the toppings. Ingredients 4 ears corn, shucked ¼ cup mayonnaise ¼ cup unsalted butter ¾ teaspoon ancho chili powder ¼ cup cilantro leaves and stems, chopped ½ cup cotija or mild feta cheese 1 lime, cut into wedges Directions Preheat an outdoor grill to medium-high heat. Grill the corn until hot and lightly charred on all sides, about 8 minutes. Alternately, boil the corn until tender, about...